Deep in the heart of the farmlands of the Midwest, a housewife tucks her children into their beds, kissing each one gently, singing softly as she leaves the room. Her little ones smile and quickly fall asleep. As she swaps the laundry from washer to dryer, she offers up a prayer for God to make his will accomplished in a situation that tries to burden her heart. Thanking him for hearing her, she dismisses the sorrowful thoughts and begins to make plans for tomorrow.

She sets a hunk of meat to thaw, brushes her hair and teeth, washes her face, and climbs into bed with her dear husband, thankful and happy for her peaceful life and a man who comes home to her.

Every bit of what she has just finished was essentially this woman being proactive. Her children feel loved, happy, and cared for because Mama created a peaceful environment for them to sleep in, leaving them with pleasant thoughts as their tired little bodies enjoy good rest.

She made sure that her family would have clean clothes available for the next few days.

In setting out the meat, she had ensured that a good, healthy dinner would be doable on the morrow, thereby avoiding stressful moments for herself. It will be easier for her and her family to be happy tomorrow, knowing she doesn’t have to devote time to a last-minute meal.

Her simple self-care routine keeps her appearance neat and helps her feel put-together and well taken care of. This boosts her confidence.

A thankful heart keeps her mind in a peaceful state, for there is no room for stress or anxiety while gratefulness is in control.

How different it would have been for her family if she had allowed bitterness to steal her proactive wisdom. Had she hurriedly put her kids to bed, glad to be rid of their pestering at last, they would have fallen asleep angry and lonely.

A washer full of sour laundry could have soured her morning, not to mention making her feel guilty as she tried to drift off to sleep, unkempt, annoyed, and exhausted mainly by the energy required to bear her own burdens.

I leave the rest to my readers’ imaginations. But this idea reaches far and wide throughout every walk of life. From the janitor in the basement to the executive on the top floor, each of us has the freedom to ask for wisdom and the ability to use it.

For you, which will it be? Will you proactively live your life or be a victim to your circumstances, reacting as you go?