Episode Transcription:

Kristen:  Hi, I’m Kristen. I’m here with Debi Pearl. We are in her herb garden that she loves to write about, and loves to spend time in.

Debi:  That’s right.

Kristen:  We’re answering questions. One question we got in was, how do I cultivate creativity in a child where it doesn’t come as natural as I see in other children. What are some projects and things I can do to really cultivate that need in them?

Debi:  I think an even better question would be, a mother who is not creative at all and she has a child who is creative… Can that mother teach a creative child or allow a creative child to really develop? A mother has to recognize the fact that she has to make the effort, that something is lacking in her, not the child, and turn that child loose. A creative child is, all she needs is something to work with. Rebbecca made this dress when she was 13 years, and it’s still around after all this time.

Kristen:  This one here?

Debi:  Yes.

Debi:  She just needed material. Some children just need some paint and something to paint on, or chalk and something to write on, or dirt or clay. A child needs books to look at, and you need to stimulate their mind by going to the library, or talking to other creative people. Beads, music. A creative child needs to be all the time churning with ideas, and colors and textures, and things along that line. A mother that doesn’t have much creativity looks at it like, “You’re making a mess again.” A mother has got to lay that down and realize that there is lots more things important in life than keeping things clean. I particularly am alive about creativity and visionary because that’s what I am. That’s what my youngest daughter is. We have made a lot of messes in her life, but it’s fun.

Kristen:  It’s paid off.

Debi:  Yes. That’s what it’s all about, you know. I would say to the mother who is a little too organized and structured, and clean and follows the books, “Lay the books down and let your child soar.” Take them to the library; let them pick out books on painting and drawing and coloring and sewing and forming clay and making mud structures. I remember one year we wanted to do a study on the American Indians in our area because we got a lot of Indian ancestry, and we wanted to redevelop that. Rebbecca made a doll a total leather Indian outfit, just a little bitty leather outfit. Then she formed the ground and the earth and everything, made a tee‑pee and made trees. It was an earthen piece of art that included clothes and it was just a great idea. She just loved it.

Every child around was fascinated and learned all about Indians, because she got something hands‑on. I’d say let your visionary, let your creative child soar and give them plenty of things to work with.

Kristen:  You mentioned not being stressed with the mess and that sort of rings true with me. As long as I have a specific area that is the mess area, this is where you can do those things, it’s not nearly as stressful as it being out in every single part of the house. Organizing the mess area, that sounds probably foreign to you.

Debi:  Basically that’s what you learn is your children. This child needs this, and this child needs this. The creative child needs tools and the opportunity to fly.

Kristen:  Right.

Debi:  So that’s what you need to do with your creative visionary.

Kristen:  Alright, well I’m inspired too. Thanks Debi.

Debi:  Good girl.


Pearls of Wisdom follows the No Greater Joy team as they discuss and answer questions about raising children, marriage, simple living, gardening, homeschooling, and more! Each week will cover different topics – topics that YOU – the viewer choose! This is a great show for the whole family and anyone who wants some extra “Pearls of Wisdom” to come their way.

 

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